Fifty Shades of Shhhh! #sexualharassment #FSOG #workplace #watercooler

FSOG2Any die-hard romance lover is waiting impatiently for next Friday, not because it’s Valentine’s Day weekend, but because the film adaptation of best-selling trilogy “Fifty Shades of Grey” will be released. It’s a major, major deal; trust me. I’ve been waiting for this with more anticipation than the Man of Steel sequel, and that’s a lot.

But one of my co-workers sent me a very important article related to the film that posits talking about it may be one person’s excited cinephile chatter and another person’s hostile work environment.

Writer Suzanne Lucas, also known as @RealEvilHRLady, penned a piece called “‘Fifty Shades’ at the Watercooler” that suggests talking about the film at work could lead to legal issues related to sexual harassment.  Continue reading “Fifty Shades of Shhhh! #sexualharassment #FSOG #workplace #watercooler”

David Oyelowo explains why Selma was snubbed at the Oscars #diversity #bias

David Oyelowo hits the nail squarely on the head in this four minute video from a Q&A at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival. Black people are celebrated more for subservience and being ‘less than,’ as opposed to being lauded for embodying positions of great power and authority, beauty or talent outside a sports arena. … Continue reading David Oyelowo explains why Selma was snubbed at the Oscars #diversity #bias

Kaley Cuoco: Feminism Is Not a Bad Word #gender #paygap #inequality #JenniferLawrence #KaleyCuoco

CuocoI find it astounding that women can claim they aren’t feminists, or that they don’t like the word feminist.

I suppose it depends on your perception of, or definition for, the word. I like the definition Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie used in her Ted talk, the one that subsequently went viral when Beyonce featured it in her hit Flawless: Feminist, a person who believes in the social, economic and political equality of the sexes. Simple. Any reasonable person can get behind that, right?

Which is why I’m confused when people like actress Kaley Cuoco cast even a hint of a shadow on the idea, which she kind of did in her latest Redbook interview. Continue reading “Kaley Cuoco: Feminism Is Not a Bad Word #gender #paygap #inequality #JenniferLawrence #KaleyCuoco”

@shondarhimes says she didn’t break the glass ceiling. Her sisters before her had already laid the path. #gender #power #diversity

Boundary breaking TV producer Shonda Rhimes was honored with the Sherry Lansing award yesterday, and her speech, well. Don’t feel bad if you get choked up. She is a fabulous  writer. “…If I had broken through the glass ceiling that would mean I’d made it through to the other side where the air is rare. I’d feel … Continue reading @shondarhimes says she didn’t break the glass ceiling. Her sisters before her had already laid the path. #gender #power #diversity

Dear Lily Allen: Point Not Well Made

Okay, so a friend hipped me to Lily Allen’s new single “Hard Out Here.” I watched the video because my buddy gushed over Allen’s supposed statement for the piece, one of empowerment and a kind of middle finger to the music industry for trying to force women into skinny, cookie cutter molds.

I get that, in theory. Allen said the video was intended as a light-hearted commentary on the objectification of women in modern pop culture. I’ll give her the benefit of the doubt that she meant well. But the trick is, to understand someone actually has to listen to, and think about, her lyrics. If you don’t, and you just look at the video – which I’m afraid is what usually happens with a lot of pop music videos – you don’t get the point.

Without those lyrics – and really, who’s going to be listening when those glorious brown bums are defying gravity and having liquids poured over them – essentially she’s doing the same thing as other music artists who feature a preponderance of scantily clad, overly sexualized women – she’s using them to get attention. Continue reading “Dear Lily Allen: Point Not Well Made”

@justsanaa, you have my deepest shopping empathy. At least we know our weakness.

In November Ebony’s cover story on tomorrow’s release The Best Man Holiday, actress Sanaa Lathan says, “It was $500 a week. I have a shopping problem sometimes,” of her winning Instagram campaign for the film and writer/director Malcom Lee’s contest/internal promotion tactics. Preach. But I’m proud to say, I haven’t bought anything in weeks. Ha! … Continue reading @justsanaa, you have my deepest shopping empathy. At least we know our weakness.